American College of Physicians: Internal Medicine — Doctors for Adults ®

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Crossed Words: Seeking some relief

From the May ACP Internist, copyright © 2014 by the American College of Physicians

By Justin Vader, MD, ACP Resident/Fellow Member

Answers to clues are placed horizontally in rows to reveal an answer written vertically. Unlike the familiar acrostic puzzle format, the final answer can be in any column.

Horizontal clues

Find in the vertical columns: The two (archaic) components from which a gastrointestinal elixir derives its name

The puzzle grid is here.

Answer: Kaolin and pectin

The puzzle answer is here.

Photo by iStock

Photo by iStock



The name “Kaopectate” originally comes from the ingredients kaolin (adsorbent) and pectin (emollient) in its initial formula. Attapulgite, a type of absorbent clay, replaced the kaolinite in the 1980s. Then, the FDA ruled in 2003 that the product had unproven effectiveness, and since 2004, bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol’s active ingredient) has been used in the U.S. In 2007, Chattem, a Sanofi company, bought Kaopectate from Johnson & Johnson. In Canada, McNeil Consumer Healthcare continues to market Kaopectate using attapulgite. (Source: Wikipedia and Chattem, Inc. websites.)

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